Muscoot Farm’s Sunday Farmer’s Market

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Last Sunday, we headed up to Muscoot Farm in Somers. We’ve been visiting this farm since A. was a baby in a stroller, just because it’s a nice place to walk around and I love to see all the animals (especially when there are babies!). Most recently J. and I took the boys geocaching on some of the trails that wind away from the farm. On Sunday mornings, though, there’s more to see than just a preserved gentleman’s farm; there’s a good-sized farmer’s market as well.

farmersmarketblogathon1The Muscoot Farmer’s Market runs Sundays from 10am – 3pm, from early May until late October. We were there with a specific purpose: to scope out the market and make some purchases as part of the first-ever Westchester Farmer’s Market Blog-A-Thon. Several food bloggers around my county are participating in this event, including Ceramic Canvas, Cooking in Westchester (Rinku’s blog, my Dimer Dalna recipe source!), Culinary Comments by Cinnamon Girl, Farmers Market Cooking, Small Bites, Somebody’s Mom, and Sweet Paprika.

090726muscoot2The sign for free garlic scapes drew us right into the Madura Farms (Pine Island, NY — Orange County) booth at the end of the row. We took a nice bunch of the scapes, and were thankful to get them for free, because as huge mushroom lovers, neither J. nor I could resist the gorgeous enoki, oyster, and mitake (Hen of the Woods) they had on offer. Can you read that price tag? Those beauties are $20 per pound. The mitakes are difficult to find — I can’t remember seeing them in a store anywhere around here. And they are a favorite of ours. So we decided to make a lunch out of mushrooms, and bought about a pound of those three varieties. There was very little waste when J. trimmed them up, too — they were very clean, firm, and just all-around perfect condition. More on what we did with them later this week!

090726muscoot4Hermosa Harvest, from Bedford, NY, also had lush, beautiful produce — I loved this collection of summer squash (especially those round zucchini). We wound up purchasing a bag of baby arugula at this vendor, plus some haricot vert. I was tempted by the bok choy for a second, but decided against it. I prepared the haricot vert (long, thin green beans) in a straightforward way, and the arugula did not become salad. More on those transformations later this week, as the Blog-A-Thon continues!

The Muscoot market has a lot of vendors selling something other than fruits and vegetables:  flowers, honey, meat and poultry, bread, and even soap. There is a dairy distributor as well. We bought some full sour pickles from Picklelicious, which were just OK;  their sun-dried tomatoes, packed in oil, were outstanding.

Certainly the boys’ favorite vendor was Dutch Desserts. We bought a package of brownies (the boys each got one, while J. and I shared one — where is the fairness in that, I ask you?!). The brownies were excellent, very moist and with a deep cocoa flavor. The gentleman at the booth was offering samples of their blueberry and chocolate tarts. I thought he meant those flavors were combined in a single dessert — wouldn’t that be delicious? But no, they were two different tarts (both were great).

We already love heading up to Muscoot Farm for the animals — going on a Sunday morning when the farmer’s market is open is even better. Next time we’ll put together a picnic lunch from our farmer’s market finds and eat it before our hike.

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